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Studies show that men who eat a diet rich in animal protein and meat, such as sausages and sausages, are more likely to die. The study showed that men who prefer animal protein to vegetable protein in their diets, 23% more likely to die than men, whose diet is more balanced in terms of protein sources. In addition, total high protein intake was associated with an increased risk of death in men diagnosed with type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease, or cancer. A study published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition: "No such association was found in men without these diseases." “These results should not be extended to older people at increased risk of malnutrition, who still contain less protein than their recommended intake,” said Healy Vertanin, Ph.D. at the University of Eastern Finland. The results highlight the need to test the effects of protein intake on health, especially in people with an existing disease. The study involved about 2,600 Finnish men aged 42 to 60 years.

Animal protein increases the risk of male death.

Studies show that men who eat a diet rich in animal protein and meat, such as sausages and sausages, are more likely to die.

The study showed that men who prefer animal protein to vegetable protein in their diets, 23% more likely to die than men, whose diet is more balanced in terms of protein sources.

In addition, total high protein intake was associated with an increased risk of death in men diagnosed with type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease, or cancer.

A study published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition: “No such association was found in men without these diseases.”

“These results should not be extended to older people at increased risk of malnutrition, who still contain less protein than their recommended intake,” said Healy Vertanin, Ph.D. at the University of Eastern Finland.

The results highlight the need to test the effects of protein intake on health, especially in people with an existing disease.

The study involved about 2,600 Finnish men aged 42 to 60 years.

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